We live in central Florida and my husband got a ticket for running a stop sign about 1 mile past the city limit sign. Any Policemen (or someone knowledgeable of the law) out there that can answer this question?
I have no problem with my husband getting the ticket because he did run the stop sign but we always thought for some reason that a city policeman had to be int the city limits and the Sheriff Dept. was for outside the city limits. We don’t want to take it to court, we were just curious.

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Comments (12)

Kazz B says:
January 14, 2011 at 4:21 pm

Just don't move to Cocoa FL then, we have one of the worse cops I know for handing out tickets,but what gets me more with her is that she is in an unmarked car, also where I live is out of city limits and she stops and tickets people all the time. the people over at the office where you pay your fine know her by her first name

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pathfinder says:
May 10, 2010 at 3:06 am

If you committed the crime withinhis jurisdiction, he can pursue you into another jurisdiction and give you a ticket.

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Josh A says:
May 10, 2010 at 2:36 am

Where are you from? As far as I understand, and officer has State Wide Jurisdiction. Most officer however would not get involved with something minor like a stop sign violation out of their jurisdiction. Unless they are badge heavy.
The only times I get involved out of my city limits is when someone is in danger of their life. So far I have yet to need to step in when out of my area.

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Sean M says:
May 10, 2010 at 2:04 am

I am not certain what the laws are in Florida, but where I work as a police officers we have state wide jurisdiction while we are on duty. Which means that I can arrest or ticket a person anywhere in the state, as long as I am on duty.

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ed14790 says:
May 10, 2010 at 1:50 am

You can Be cited. No matter who the officer works for, the citation should have the Court's information for the jurisdiction you were stopped in, not the cops courts jurisdiction.

Ex..is you were stopped in John City by a Smith City Cop. The smith cop has to cite you onto John City Court.

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Shaun A says:
May 10, 2010 at 1:49 am

I'm not exactly sure what the Florida law is. But in the state that I work as a police officer, you can go five miles past your jurisdiction.

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someonecanbme says:
May 10, 2010 at 1:02 am

asked and answered a butt load of times already. no officer is restricted by "city limits". the precinct that a ticket is cited into changes by area. that is the only difference.

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fr_chuck says:
May 10, 2010 at 1:00 am

Unless they are also sworn county police officers also.
Many police officers get sworn in as county police offcers ( reserve)

But in general they can only write a ticket within thier jurisdiction. Remember the city may have expanded past the old city limit signs, or some areas by agreement of the city councel come under city protection

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Pobept says:
May 10, 2010 at 12:38 am

yes, if he saw the violation, he has the authotity to arrest or ticket you!

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MyGirlfriendLikesMyBaldHead says:
May 10, 2010 at 12:13 am

The location of the city limits sign is not always where the city starts or ends. Cities annex property all the time so they may have extended the city limits and never moved the sign. Even if it is outside the city limits police officers are certified by the state as officers not by the city they work in, so even if he is outside of his city he can still issue you a citation.

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Brian M says:
May 9, 2010 at 11:32 pm

Actually the cop s outside of there jurisdiction, however some police are given police powers thorughout the state and therefore can give a ticket anywhere in Florida. Also most cities have agreements with neighbor jurisdictions that allow them to extend there jurisdiction 1 mile outside of the city or county limits.

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My Evil Twin says:
May 9, 2010 at 11:02 pm

Yes. Just because you're outside the city limits doesn't give you the right to violate a motor vehicle regulation, and the city cop has every right to cite you and show up in court to witness against you.

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